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First Information Report and It’s Evidentiary Value

Whenever a crime takes place the first thought that comes in your mind is going to the police station and file an F.I.R. But do we even know what is the evidentiary value of F.I.R in legal system. So, let’s get started with the basics first.

What is a F.I.R?
FIR or first information report is a document in written prepared by the police when they get the information of commission of a cognizable offense. It is a report which contains the information that the police get first in point of time and that is why it is called a first information report.
In a layman’s language, fir is a report that the police prepare with the first information they get about the crime committed. It is generally a complaint lodged by the victim or anyone on his/her behalf.
The legal term is not defined under any law but Section 154 & section 155 of CrPC discuss the cognizance of any information related to cognizable offenses and non-cognizable offenses respectively.

Why is FIR important?
FIR is an important part of the whole procedure as it sets the criminal justice in lead. After the lodging of the FIR, the police will take up the investigation of the case.

What should you mention in FIR?
• Name.
• Address.
• Facts of the incident as occurred.
• Date, time, and location of the incident.
• Name and description of the person involved in the crime.

What is the evidentiary value of F.I.R?
The evidentiary value of FIR is much important than any statement in the whole process. Without the FIR a case never really starts as it is a document in written prepared by the police when they get the information of commission of a cognizable offense. It is a report which contains the information that the police get first in point of time and that is why it is called a first information report. The evidentiary value of FIR is very important during the process of cognizance of any offense or at the initial time of the beginning of the investigation about information recorded as per Section 154 or 155 of CrPC.
After confirming the provision, it can be made to believe that the FIR is a crucial report and if duly recorded adds valuable evidence. Now it can easily be taken as an important and essential piece of evidence in any trial either for the aspiration of confirming evidence or for contradicting witnesses. FIR can sometimes also be considered as Substantial Evidence but in most cases, it ends up having a just value of an important piece of evidence. Hence, we can assume that FIR is a crucial and circumstantial piece of evidence.

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